What kind of online student are you?

What kind of online student are you?


Online learning is a reality for many students but the real question is… are you the at-home teacher or the proclaimed procrastinator? Find out which one you fall under!

Time

I know from experience, how much effort goes into learning a subject and or degree online. You may be the at-home teacher who sets aside desired time each week to watch lectures and go through content just as if you were attending a face-to-face class. But let’s be real, not having set times to watch a lecture can mean the procrastinator within us comes out and we tend to leave the work to the last minute.

Online meetings

Many online meetings are not compulsory, but are highly suggested for you to get the full learning experience and gain feedback from your lecturer and peers. The at-home teacher tends to attend every single online meeting so that they can ask real-time questions. On the other hand, the proclaimed procrastinator will watch the recorded meeting when they find time later that week (or the week after!)

Additional Readings

After having finished the lecture and textbook readings, the most dreaded words to stumble across are ‘additional readings.’ The proclaimed procrastinator questions if it is really necessary to read them all, while the at-home teacher has probably even read next week’s additional readings already!

Announcements

Of course, the at-home teacher is always up-to-date with announcements, and the proclaimed procrastinator avoids reading their emails or checking announcements in fear that they will have more work or readings to procrastinate with.

In all seriousness, as an online student it is hard to find motivation and sometimes you have a great week and other times where things get slightly delayed. In the long run, whether you are an at-home teach or proclaimed procrastinator, as long as you find a system that works for you and you get the work done… well, it doesn’t matter what kind of online student you are!

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